Our Centenary
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Centenary Ambassador Welcome Night

Past Event
2015-11-11T23:59

What's happening?

Our Centenary Ambassadors came together on 11 November 2015 for the first time to meet each other and discuss what amazing events we can bring to the communication in 2016. Our Centenary Ambassadors are influential and forward-thinking individuals who are highly passionate about education and who have, over the years, made inspiring contributions to this sector.

Location

The Faculty of Education, Nedlands Campus.

The Changing World of Education Forum

Past Event
2016-03-09T23:59

Photos posted by UWA Faculty Of Education

Follow the Education Centenary celebration on instagram

What happened

How schooling has changed in a 100 years!  We've seen an evolution in the delivery and quality of learning opportunities for young people.  What have leaders of Education learned from these changes?  How are today's institutions of Education preparing our children and our society for a changing world?

These were some of the questions that Professor Helen Wildy and the six Ministers for Education spanning from 1987 - 2016 discussed on 9 March 2016. Panel members included the Honourable Colin Barnett, Premier of Western Australia, the Honourable Mark McGowan, Leader of the Opposition, the Honourable Peter Collier, Minister for Education, the Honourable Elizabeth Constable, Former Minister for Education, Professor Carmen Lawrence, Former Premier of Western Australia, and the Honourable Robert Pearce, Former Minister for Education.

The panel discussion was moderated by Miriam Borthwick.


 


National curriculum policy reform in UK & Australia

Past Event
2016-04-06T23:59

What's happening?

National curriculum policy reform in England and Australia: implications for students, teachers and social justice

The National Curriculum was introduced in England in 1988 and the Australian Curriculum announced 20 years later, in 2008. Dr Christine Winter from Sheffield University will begin her presentation  with a brief history of events leading to the decision to introduce a national curriculum in each country.

In order to begin to think about a comparative analysis of curriculum policy reform in England and Australia, the presentation switches to the present and the idea of the Global Education Reform Movement (GERM) which identifies five recurring international trends in education policy: curriculum and assessment standardisation; focus on literacy and numeracy; safe and low-risk curriculum; business management procedures; and high-stakes testing.

Although these common trends have been recognised in Anglo-American systems, their manifestation in policy and practice in different national contexts varies, being influenced by specific cultural, economic and political histories.

Brief biography of speaker:

Dr Christine Winter works in the field of Educational Studies at the University of  Sheffield. She is Education Pathway Lead for the White Rose Doctoral Training Centre, the ESRC-funded post graduate training consortium of the Universities of Sheffield, Leeds and York, and a former Director of the University of Sheffield EdD programme. Her research focuses on the school curriculum with specific interests in curriculum knowledge, politics, policy and practice; globalization and global citizenship education. She has published in such prestigious journals as Journal of Education Policy, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Curriculum Journal, Ethics and Education and Progress in Human Geography and jointly edited a book published by Wiley Blackwell: Re-Imagining relationships in education: ethics, politics and practices. 


Eventbrite - National curriculum policy reform in England and Australia

Location

The Education Building

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.

What is doctorateness seminar

Past Event
2016-04-07T23:59

What's happening?

Re-inventing doctoral education through Doctoral Training Centres in the UK: Is the PhD converging with the Professional Doctorate?

This presentation begins with a brief review of the history of the Professional Doctorate in Education (or EdD) before focusing on some of the reasons applicants choose the professional doctorate path. One key debate in the field is the question of ‘what is doctorateness?’

The Sheffield EdD Programme, one of the first to be introduced into a UK university, recently celebrated its 20th anniversary. When the Programme switched from a generic structure to one offering discrete pathways, recruitment increased and opportunities were provided for research specialism expansion, alongside engagement in doctoral education of the generic methodological kind. The Programme has continued to flourish.

In a parallel space of the conventional PhD, in 2010 a consortium of Leeds, Sheffield and York Universities won one of the 21 Economic and Social Research Council Doctoral Training Centre awards worth £20 million over 5 years. Exciting interdisciplinary and interinstitutional developments in doctoral education have emerged from this consortium of three elite ‘Russell Group’ Universities. The competition for follow-on funding is currently underway and the consortium has submitted a proposal founded on interdisciplinary and interinstitutional goals plus a commitment to collaborative research training with non-academic partners. This latter development mirrors the drive to improve the impact of university research emanating from UK Research Councils. It also provides the opportunity for conventional PhD Education programs to learn from EdD programs and give birth to a new generation of doctoral awards. But what happens to ‘doctorateness’ in the meantime?

Brief biography of speaker

Dr Christine Winter works in the field of Educational Studies at the University of Sheffield. She is Education Pathway Lead for the White Rose Doctoral Training Centre, the ESRC-funded post graduate training consortium of the Universities of Sheffield, Leeds and York, and a former Director of the University of Sheffield EdD program. Her research focuses on the school curriculum with specific interests in curriculum knowledge, politics, policy and practice; globalization and global citizenship education. She has published in such prestigious journals as Journal of Education Policy, Journal of Philosophy of Education, Curriculum Journal, Ethics and Education and Progress in Human Geography and jointly edited a book published by Wiley Blackwell: Re-Imagining relationships in education: ethics, politics and practices.

Eventbrite - National curriculum policy reform in England and Australia

Location

The Education Building, Education Building Conference Room

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.

The Australian Curriculum and the 2014 review and its aftermath

Past Event
2016-05-05T23:59

What's happening?

The Australian Curriculum and the 2014 Review and its Aftermath: An outside - inside perspective

This is an outsider [university professor] - insider [Lead Writer] perspective of the past few years of the Australian Curriculum. There are three parts:

  • An insight into developing the Australian Curriculum and the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship
  • What and why of the 2014 Review
  • The response to the Review and its aftermath and the future for the Australian Curriculum: Civics and Citizenship

Speaker bio

Professor Murray Print is a recognised leader in civics and political education and curriculum development within Australia and internationally. He directed the Consortium Project in Civics and Citizenship Education, as well as a major ARC-funded project on youth participation in democracy, and has been chief investigator in many other projects in civics covering:

  •     Youth Electoral Study
  •     values, policy and civics education in the Asia-Pacific region
  •     civics education, assessment and benchmarking
  •     the first phase of the International Association for the Evaluation of Educational Achievement (IEA) international civics study


In 2011 Professor Print was appointed to lead the development of the Civics and Citizenship Curriculum for all Australian schools within the Australian Curriculum. The Australian Curriculum Civics and Citizenship was completed in late 2013. He participated in the response to the review of the Australian Curriculum Civics and Citizenship and the final version that was published in 2015. Professor Print is a UWA Faculty of Education Graduate.

Eventbrite - The Australian Curriculum

Location

The University of Western Australia, The Education Building, Nedlands Campus

Level 2, Conference Room 2.34

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.

Children are not rockets

Past Event
2016-05-27T23:59

What's happening?

Children are not rockets: Growth, patterns and processes in the language development of preschool and early primary school children

Australian children have been the focus of pioneering studies of early language development. These contemporary Australian population studies of language growth and patterns over time are producing a vastly different picture from the boutique studies of the early 1970’s that positioned language development so firmly as an outcome of maternal input. The findings from these population studies are reshaping what we believe about children’s language development and about who (or what) is in charge of it! From among the children who start talking early or late and from among the vast majority of typically developing children emerges a picture of a remarkably robust developmental endowment. Do genes matter? Does starting late produce onward disadvantage? Do early starters rocket off the chart? And, what do these findings tell us about the design of more optimal expectations and opportunities for the development of all children?

 

Speaker bio

Professor Stephen Zubrick is a well-known developmental scientist responsible for some of the largest Australian studies of child and adolescent health and wellbeing. Prior to joining the University of Western Australia, Faculty of Education, was the former Head of the Division of Population Science at the Telethon Kids Institute, and then a Senior Principal Research Fellow there. His qualifications are in the fields of psychology, and speech and hearing science. Steve had a lengthy career in Western Australia as the state’s Assistant Principal Clinical Psychologist and was based at the Neurosciences Unit, where he specialised in assessing and managing children with complex developmental disorders. He now specialises in creating and executing large-scale state and national cross-sectional and longitudinal studies of child and family development. He chairs the Consortium Advisory Group responsible for the ongoing conduct of the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children, and is a member of the Steering Committee of the Longitudinal Study of Indigenous Children.

 

 

 

Eventbrite - National curriculum policy reform in England and Australia

Location

The University of Western Australia, Hew Roberts Lecture Theatre, Nedlands Campus

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.

Prize Giving 2016

Past Event
2016-06-07T23:59

What's happening?

Our annual Prize Giving Ceremony is a special evening where we recognise the hard work and dedication of past and present students and our staff together with our supporters.

Location

The University Club

2 Hackett Drive, Crawley WA 6009, Australia.

Young minds matter seminar

Past Event
2016-09-06T23:59

What's happening?

Mental health and wellbeing of children and young people and attendance, engagement and performance in school

Mental health problems are common in children and adolescents and, when not detected early, can be persistent and disabling. In childhood and adolescence, poor mental health can adversely affect children’s developmental trajectories, and can negatively impact educational outcomes.

Young Minds Matter is the largest survey of child and adolescent mental health and wellbeing ever conducted in Australia. The parents and carers of over 6,000 children aged 4-17 years around Australia were interviewed, and almost 3,000 young people aged 11-17 years completed a separate questionnaire in private. The survey measured the prevalence, impact and burden of mental disorders, and collected information on use of services, and unmet need for services in both the health and education sectors. The survey also collected information on attendance and engagement with school, and participants gave consent to access NAPLAN test results.

As part of UWA Research Week Professor David Lawrence from the Telethon Kids Institute and the Faculty of Education will present key results from Young Minds Matter, and will also draw on findings from Student Attendance and Educational Outcomes: Every Day Counts and the Western Australian Aboriginal Child Health Survey to examine the relationships between mental health and wellbeing and educational outcomes.

 

Speaker Bio

Professor David Lawrence is a leading Australian statistician, survey methodologist and social researcher. His research experience covers a range of disciplines including biostatistics and epidemiology, mental health and Indigenous wellbeing. He currently leads Young Minds Matter: The Second Australian Child and Adolescent Survey of Mental Health and Wellbeing. He has internationally recognised expertise in the analysis of linked administrative datasets, data from complex household surveys, administrative data linked to survey datasets, multi-level modelling, non-linear modelling, and time-series analysis. David has a career-long interest in outcomes for children and families with disadvantaged backgrounds.

Eventbrite - National curriculum policy reform in England and Australia

Location

Hew Roberts Lecture Theatre, The University of Western Australia, Nedlands Campus

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.

Teachers as agents of change

Past Event
2016-09-15T23:59

What's happening?

Making connections between human rights, social justice and global citizenship in our education systems.

“Education for human development … the goal of producing decent world citizens who can understand ...global problems ….and who have the practical competence and the motivational incentives to do something about these problems. How, then, would we produce such citizens?”  (Martha Nussbaum, Education for Profit, Education for Freedom, 2009)

The impact of geo-political tensions in areas such as the Middle East and Afghanistan have brought the issues of human rights abuses to the forefront of national conversations both in Australia and internationally. This is particularly relevant to such issues as women's empowerment and how the world is dealing with the greatest refugee crisis since the Second World War.

As academics in the field of Education, what are our responsibilities in training our pre-service teachers so that they are skilled in enabling students of all ages to grapple with these issues in and outside the classroom?

Associate Professor Nina Burridge from the University of Technology Sydney will revisit the principles that are essential to a ‘good education’ in preparing the global citizens of tomorrow. Underpinning her discussion is Martha Nussbaum’s (2009) definition of ‘education for human development’.

Education for human development encompasses all the expected pedagogical practices of engaging young minds to gain knowledge, succeed at school and develop successful careers. This is done within a framework of promoting critical thinking and an education for a just and inclusive society that underpins the responsibilities of global citizenship and the importance of ethical behaviour in everyday life.

In illustrating this approach Nina will discuss research related to the extent to which the Australian curriculum and schools focus on human rights issues. She will also highlight her work with colleagues on gender and education in Afghanistan as an example of how it relates to improving young people’s understanding of global issues with the ultimate aim of producing decent world citizens who understand global problems and are motivated to explore global solutions to these problems.

 

Speaker Bio

Associate Professor Nina Burridge works in  the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at the University of Technology, Sydney.  She completed her BA Dip Ed at UWA and taught at Perth Modern School. Nina has been involved in Education faculties at Macquarie University, the University of Sydney and at UTS where  she was Co-Director of the Cosmopolitan Civil Societies Research Centre from 2008 -2015.  Her main research interests and publications centre on Education for social justice and human rights within Australia and in international contexts.  She has completed projects on Indigenous Education, cultural diversity, human rights and democratic citizenship and more recently women’s empowerment.


Nina has published two books on Indigenous Education and a major report for the Australian Attorney General’s Department on Human Rights Education in Australian Schools.  She visited Iran and Afghanistan in 2012 researching women’s empowerment and has collaborated with the Gawharshad Institute of Higher Education in Kabul on a research project on the educational aspirations of  young women in Afghanistan. She has also been part of an Action Aid delegation to Myanmar to observe their women’s empowerment activities in Yangon and surrounding provinces.


In 2012 she received the UTS Social Inclusion Award: For Sustained commitment to improving education and human rights for women in Australia and internationally. In 2007 she received the Edmund Rice Centre Human Rights Award for outstanding service in campaigning for human rights for ‘Indigenous, Refugees and Asylum Seekers.

 

 

Eventbrite - The Australian Curriculum

Location

The Hew Roberts Lecture Theatre, Nedlands Campus

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.

2016 AARE Theory Workshops

Past Event
2016-10-28T23:59

What's happening?

2016 AARE Theory Workshops

Australian Association for Research in Education (AARE) invites early career researchers and higher degree research students from UWA to attend this weekend of research workshops. These popular workshops are organised collaboratively with universities and provide opportunities for participants to:

  • be immersed in theory
  • consider how theory applies to their research
  • engage in discussions with – and to learn from – experienced researchers/experts from the field

For more information please contact Dr Christine Howitt on christine.howitt@uwa.edu.au or 08 6488 3038

Register here

Resources

 

Location

The University of Western Australia

Friday evening: The Hew Roberts Lecture Theatre, Nedlands Campus, Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009

Saturday/Sunday: G9 and G10 in the Education Building

The shifting landscape of Australian schooling reform

Past Event
2016-11-03T23:59

What's happening?

The shifting landscape of Australian schooling reform: Possibilities. problems and politics

Australian schooling is undergoing rapid change as a result of unprecedented national reforms in areas including curriculum, assessment, teaching standards and school funding. While there are strong arguments for national consistency on the grounds of equity, effectiveness and efficiency, attempts to achieve national reform face a number of complex challenges. In Australia’s federal system, states and territories retain responsibility for schooling, yet recent decades have seen federal government influence progressively increase, intergovernmental agreements and processes intensify, and powerful new roles emerge for policy organisations such as the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority (ACARA), and the Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL). This shifting political and policy landscape is generating heightened uncertainty and contestation about how schools are governed, how policies are developed and about which level of government is ‘best placed’ to govern education into the future. In this context, questions about who steers or controls schooling are not only more frequent, but are also increasingly difficult to answer. In this seminar, Dr. Glenn Savage will analyse the complex ways that national schooling reforms are evolving in Australia’s federal system, with a particular focus on how state education departments and agencies are responding to national reforms. Based on emerging findings from a current Australian Research Council project, Dr. Savage will examine the possibilities, problems and political challenges being generated in the contemporary reform landscape, and make recommendations for improving national policy processes.

Brief biography of speaker:

Dr. Glenn Savage is a Senior Lecturer in Education Policy and Politics in the Melbourne Graduate School of Education at the University of Melbourne. His research focuses on education policy, politics and governance at national and global levels, with a specific interest in federalism, intergovernmental relations, and policies relating to curriculum, equity and standards-based reform. Dr. Savage currently holds an Australian Research Council ‘Discovery Early Career Researcher Award’ (DECRA) titled ‘National schooling reform and the reshaping of Australian federalism’ (2016–2019).


Eventbrite - The shifting landscape of australian schooling reform

Location

The Education Building

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.

Stand out from the crowd

Past Event
2016-11-10T23:59

What's happening?

Stand out from the crowd and accelerate your success

Developing a personal brand that is unique, visible and strong is vital in today’s current climate. UWA Alumni and Centenary Ambassador Shona Rowan will host an interactive workshop on how to be successful and stand out from the crowd.  She will demonstrate how to develop a public persona that stands for something clear, powerful and compelling in the minds of the people you come into contact with.  Shona is a trained psychologist, ex-international ballroom dancing champion and performance consultant who has mapped out a successful career in the UK working with companies including Shell, The Royal Bank of Scotland and  Citi Bank.

For more information on Shona Rowan please visit www.shonarowan.co.uk

Eventbrite - The Australian Curriculum

Location

The Hew Roberts Lecture Theatre, Nedlands Campus

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.

Fogarty Forum 2016

Past Event
2016-11-30T23:59

What's happening?

Fogarty Foundation Postgraduate Research Forum

The Fogarty Foundation Postgraduate Research Forum is an opportunity to showcase education-related research and receive valuable feedback from the education research community in Western Australia.

This year, work will be presented by students from The University of Western Australia, Edith Cowan University and Murdoch University in both 'Ignite' (short presentation stimulating discussion) and 'Insight' (traditional academic presentation) formats.

Eventbrite - Fogarty Forum 2016

Location

Faculty of Education, Nedlands Campus

Cnr of Stirling Highway and Hampden Road, Nedlands 6009.